Do we experience a change in life each day?

By Swathika.


Some people prefer to spend their lives doing the same things and avoiding a change. Others however, think that change is always a good thing.

Here are my views and opinions:

The world is a place filled with joy and uniqueness, each and every day you get to meet people of different personalities, with a myriad of views and opinions about life! Many would want to experience a change in life each day. On the other hand, there would be a few others who would prefer to spend their lives in a more routine manner.

Generally, most people who want a change in life often end up being travelers, experiencing new cultures and learning new languages. This is one of the most common ways I have seen people bring about changes in their lives. In fact, globalization and technological advancements has further made the lives of such personalities adventurous, but we are well aware of the fact that not everyone in this world is the same and there has always been another side of the coin.

I’ve personally felt that it is those people living in the urbanized regions of the world, those of whom are unaware of things outside their work environment and family who lead a monotonous life. However, the word “change” is entirely perspective and to some it could just mean- “meeting new people from various family and geographical backgrounds” and to a few others it could just mean “learning something new” and so on . . . so even someone living a mechanized environment filled with just workload, could experience a change each day!

I personally believe that no one can really avoid change in life expect those who are completely isolated, living in their own world we never know, even they might experience a change each day in their world of isolation. So this still leaves the question unanswered!

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“Rajpart Rangathurai” – Sivaji Ganesan

By Swathika.


Sivaji Ganesan, also known as “Nadigar Thilagam”, is one the best artists Tamil cinema has ever seen until this day. His contributions to Tamil cinema are endless, and he has acted in 283 films in Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam and Hindi. His versatility and photographic memory are still the talk of the town even today!

“Rajpart Rangathurai” is a classic Tamil movie that talks about a group of theater artists who play moral ancient stories and are disrespected by the modern audience. The story line moves on to further tell us about the struggles that they face in order to keep up with the expectations of  the modern audience.

This film not only depicts the battles that a theater artist faces in his life but also teaches the audience how to overcome the greatest struggles of our life. Sivaji Ganesan who plays the role of “Rajpart Rangathurai” is the protagonist and he is supported by other great film actors of Tamil cinema industry such as Monarama, M.N Nambiar and V.K Ramaswamy. This movie not only captures the audiences’ attention throughout, but carries its momentum till the end. The versatile nature of Sivaji Ganesan, that the Tamil industry talks about even today can be witnessed by the audience very clearly in this film through the different roles he is seen to play within just the two hours and a half of the film. This film is a must-watch for all, particularly music lovers as all nine songs of this film are simply superb! So why wait? Watch the movie straightaway if you haven’t yet!

Necropolis: The Tale of the Third Sword

By Sitara.


Jake Wyatt’s story of the Third Sword began in 2012, when he was working on character design for Wooden Teeth and one of his sketches evolved into a girl with a sword and a coat. Jake was so intrigued by these sketches that he decided the girl needed her own story. In the months that followed, he produced three test pages of the Third Sword walking through the eponymous Necropolis, battling unnamed horrors. In May 2013, he began publishing serialised pages of the comic, starting with a prologue detailing the thousand-year-old lore of Hyberia, the mythical landscape of Necropolis.

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Necropolis follows the tale of its unnamed protagonist, a young girl from the Hinterlands. After she witnesses the destruction of her village at the hands of bandits, she sells her soul to a trader of the Night Market in exchange for a sword of unimaginable power. Wielding her massive sword, she exacts revenge on the murdering bandits and begins a killing spree in the Hinterlands until a pair of imperial wardens pay her a visit.

Despite the generic theme of a young girl with a sword in a medieval setting, Jake’s art and writing set it apart. The Third Sword’s world is intricate, with its implications of sorcery and hedge magic, and its matriarchal political system, and its geography and landscape. Necropolis is drawn in scratchy lines and muted colours, with Jake’s characteristic attention to detail.

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The published comic is still at an early stage, but Jake has already mapped out its course for the future. “The first big arc is probably about 300 pages, and can stand on its own,” he says. “There’s a bunch of middle adventures I’d like to tell after that, and then another 150-300 page story to wrap it all up.” He works with his wife Kathryn, who helps with the writing and sometimes with the comics’ colouring process. Each page takes about eight to sixteen hours to finish, and they’re published online at the rate of at least two pages a month. Jake thinks he might take the next year off to work full-time on the first arc.

The creators intend to release the finished comic in print some day, but until then you can read it in its webcomic form.

A submission.


Consider this.

Why did we have to create a universal father figure or mother figure and spend all our energy weaving tales around them, creating abodes for them and seeking to find them there, and hoping to lead us to our very end? Why do we need gods? Is it not enough to be a believer, believing that we have roles to play, be they trivial or precious, and being acutely aware of this and seeking a place to fit in?

The universe is the playground and magic is the game. Some try performing the magic. Others watch it unfold. A few reveal the magic. The magicians and the spectators both are equally precious for the act to continue.

The Rhyming Cockney Accent of Britain

By Swathika.


Cockney, originally used as a pejorative term for all city-dwellers, is now used to refer to all the working-class people in London’s East End. It traditionally refers to the accent of English spoken by the working-class population of London, and it became known as Estuary English. Some of the common features of this accent are the glottal stop, substituting a /w/ for /l/, dropping the /h/ for the /a/ in words, and the rhyming slang.

However, studies have now shown that in London’s East End some traditional features of cockney have been displaced by a Jamaican Creole-influenced variety popular among young Londoners known as ‘Jafaican’, also referred to as Multi-Cultural London English.  But features of the cockney such as the double negatives, rhyming slang, and the glottal stop are still in use. Other features of cockney also include: the raised vowel in words like ‘trap’ and ‘cat’ so these sound like ‘trep’ and ‘cet’; non-rhoticity, meaning the ‘r’ at the end of words isn’t pronounced; trap-bath split, meaning that certain ‘a’ words like ‘bath’, ‘can’t’, ‘dance’, are pronounced with the broad-a in ‘father’; and th-fronting.

These videos from the British TV show “Mind Your Language” provide some examples of cockney rhyming slang.

This is a cockney slang speech example: